The Mouth

Malocclusions
Rabbits born with this have a genetic fault. When the bottom set of teeth come up over the top, and split and eventually break off, this is a malocclusion. Breeders cull these rabbits since it is passed on to the next litter. This doesn’t become life threatening unless the teeth make it where the rabbit can’t eat. Some rabbits even have mild malocclusions where the teeth don’t even grow long or split. Teeth should be clipped with nail clippers, or if you’re a pet owner, take it to a professional. The teeth clip rather easier than you would think, but it is often hard to get the rabbit to sit still for the clipping. Many PETA like organizations insist upon surgically removing teeth like this, but that is simply not needed and far from humane. Simple clipping (depending on rate of growth) can keep the teeth in check and pose no long term side effects. A rabbit can eat normally this way and does not need special treatment.

Broken Teeth
This is often from an injury from fighting, or from chewing on the cage or something similar. This could sometimes lead to a Malocclusion. Teeth will probably need to be clipped and may or may not grow back into place as they once were.

Slobbers/Dermatitis
This is where the rabbit seems to be drooling and fur is matted and wet around the mouth and neck. This is often from an abscessed tooth. If the dewlap is what is wet, then this could be Dermatitis. This is often seen with an older doe with an oversized dewlap (skin below the mouth on the neck) and it drags on the cage floor and gets into the water dish. The best thing to do, would be give her a water bottle instead. Abscesses often have to be surgically removed.

Abscesses
This is from very poor sanitation. They are often found around the mouth and neck. It happens when the rabbit gets a cut or a score, bacteria invade the body and this sets in. These rabbits can die without treatment, but it is best to cull the animal and clean all your equipment.

The Tongue
The tongue rarely has anything to do with disease, other than the rare mouth cancer. When the tongue is blue, it is a sign of pneumonia. When doing an necropsy immediately after death and tongue is already blue, then it was probably snuffles or pneumonia that killed the rabbit.